Forums Archive Index > Outdoor Power Equipment > New Snow Blower Tire Pressure

Author: jubol

Date: 11 Dec 2005 8:14 am

:lol: :lol:

You folks with new snowblowers, check your tire pressure.

The maker of your new toy overinflates the tires for shipping.

My Husky manual reccomends 14-17 PSI.
Fred 8) 8)


Author: snowshoveler

Date: 11 Dec 2005 8:57 am

good call there Fred.
the snowblowers are usually strapped to pallets and then they blow the tires up quite a bit to keep the blower from moving on pallet.
tractors are done the same.
you should get extra milk and cookies for pointing that out.
i always forget to mention that when i think about it.
chris


Author: ramit

Date: 11 Dec 2005 3:10 pm

Interesting comment, how high were they coming at?

Just referring to my Toro manual, it states 17 - 20psi.

Just to throw some thoughts into the conversation,

I don't remember what it says on the tires on my Toro for make psi.

The tires I had on my old craftsman had a max psi marked on them of like 30psi.

I used to keep my old craftsman at the max rating and the tires were still perfect 16 year later.

I know for trucks and cars, the tire pressure needs to be figured out based on load on each corner ( really axle set). So on my truck when I was loaded to max and towing, I was up at 80psi, but for normal driving and wear I was at 55psi in the front and 40 in the rear.

But I don't think the snowblowers need that attention?
I would think one would be more concerned with blowing the bead/tire of the rim if under inflated...

I could see on a lawn tractor for floatation wanting to run at a pressure as low as possible for good wear but better tire foot print? I don't own one, but again from running a tuck across lawns to pull out stumps and from running off road, tire pressure is extremely important for a compromise of keeping the bead, floatation when needed and if and when hauling.


Author: Bill_D

Date: 11 Dec 2005 7:31 pm

ramit wrote:

I know for trucks and cars, the tire pressure needs to be figured out based on load on each corner ( really axle set). So on my truck when I was loaded to max and towing, I was up at 80psi, but for normal driving and wear I was at 55psi in the front and 40 in the rear.


Ramit, what are you driving???? Ya should NEVER be runnin that kind of psi on a radial tire. Especially under load, you'll blow out a sidewall in a heart beat at any small bump in the road. 35-40 max I would suggest. Unless you are refferring to a commercial rig, then I retract my comment. Happy motoring. 8)


Author: robmints

Date: 11 Dec 2005 7:53 pm

http://www.ricksontruck.com/


Author: ramit

Date: 11 Dec 2005 7:58 pm

Bill,

No big commerical truck, just a Pickup tuck.

It requires a load range E, 16" rims, rated at 80psi @ 3042lbs each.
That's the ratings on the sidewalls. Michelins. LTX at: 245/75 RR16
http://www.tirerack.com/tires/Spec.jsp?make=Michelin&model=LTX+A%2FT

Now for the other extreme of tire pressure to make you flip a bit more...
Off road in the sand, (and not going more than 5mph), I run the same tires down to 12psi for floatation. Got 40K miles out of the 1st set.
Below 7psi and I could pop a bead. But at such low speeds, I don't have to worry about heat build up and need a nice marshmellow foot print.

My new tires are 65psi @ 3195lbs each. Load Range E 16" 33x12.5
33X12.50R16/E
http://dirtgriptires.com/Sizes%20and%20Specifications.htm


One tire alone of either is all that's needed to support a small car at full pressure for the whole life of the tire, if you wanted a uni-car !


Author: ramit

Date: 11 Dec 2005 8:00 pm

robmints wrote:
http://www.ricksontruck.com/

Oh yea those things.. great for hauling over the road if that's all you do.
I know guys that use them and love em.
Great way to increase stability and such. But for of road too much sidwall to loose for me.


Author: SnowPro

Date: 11 Dec 2005 8:13 pm

I run snowblower air pressure at about 14 psi. The tires call for 30 psi max. but I find that at that pressure, the machines hit quite hard when they are rolled of the back of the truck. That did mean that I had to tighten up the chains though.

As far as truck tire pressure goes, my one ton dump runs 65 psi regularly and 80 psi when I am hauling soil. And no, I don't carry the blowers in the back of the dump, if you were thinking that! :P Verticle drop is about 5 feet!


Ken
:)


Author: SnowPro

Date: 11 Dec 2005 8:16 pm

Ramit was writing at the same time that I was. My tires are 235/85/16. Pretty similar.

Ken
:)


Author: ramit

Date: 11 Dec 2005 8:17 pm

that would be some trick to get them back up into the dump truck!!
Down's always easier.. just the landing that can hurt.


Author: SnowPro

Date: 11 Dec 2005 8:21 pm

ramit wrote:
that would be some trick to get them back up into the dump truck!!
Down's always easier.. just the landing that can hurt.


You got that right!! :lol:

But you would be amazed at how many clients think that I should use the dump for the blowers. They also think that I can haul snow with it. :? I ask them if they think that I am to BLOW the snow into the truck???? :? Then the light goes on! :idea:
Ken
:roll:


Author: robmints

Date: 11 Dec 2005 8:32 pm

ramit wrote:
robmints wrote:
http://www.ricksontruck.com/

Oh yea those things.. great for hauling over the road if that's all you do.
I know guys that use them and love em.
Great way to increase stability and such. But for of road too much sidwall to loose for me.




They are 70's instead of 75's you don't lose much if any sidewall. The truck might be slightly higher,but the tires are stiffer so the truck will handle better than stock. Most times you need to redo the speedo. They are great for hauling and will carry loads and go over stuff no LT tires that I know of will. The truck, most times, will ride better loaded or unloaded than it will with LT tires. My next door neighbor works there. I don't even like her, but I must admit, the set-up is better than anything else I know of.

PS. Not my truck. I drive an Expedtion with Michelin LTs.


Author: ramit

Date: 11 Dec 2005 8:43 pm

I've heard that guys that have them love the way the tow with them.
But they did say that they road a bit stiffer, since the rim is much taller ( 16 vs 19.5, less sidewall and a stiffer side wall = much better stability... so much better towing. It all made sense.

With all that said, I can't see how they ride better unloaded.
It's like taking a car and sticking 18's on it.

I've not riden in a truck with them. So no first hand experience.
Just the guys on the board that bought them.

Which brings me to a rant...
But some of these guys are towing stuff way beyond the rating of the driveline too. So I can see the need for the tire.. as you say they'll handle much more than the E rated tires will... (F,G and H).. but the driveline,brakes, and suspension isn't safely rated for the load some of these guys are towing and hauling with 1 ton P/U's , hence the 450/550 and Kenworths and Peterbuits and now the CXTs, LOL..


Author: Marshall

Date: 11 Dec 2005 9:33 pm

I like more sidewall than less. I can make them be how I want them to be on and off road. Don't have to worry about busting rims either.


Author: Bill_D

Date: 11 Dec 2005 10:08 pm

Gotchya Ramit. I was envisioning your car w/ 80lbs psi in them, like damn!!!! :shock: :shock:


Author: ramit

Date: 11 Dec 2005 10:17 pm

no car, just 22,000 GCVW.
1 ton diesel.


Author: Bill_D

Date: 11 Dec 2005 10:50 pm

Ohh, is that all?? :lol: :lol: Nice!!


Author: ramit

Date: 11 Dec 2005 11:00 pm

Thanks, it's my baby.



with the old tires and before they changed the rules for camping on the outer beaches ( south shore Long Island.. Smiths' Point Park).

Now everyone is stuffed into a 1 mile stretch and it gets crowded.


Author: jubol

Date: 12 Dec 2005 4:35 am

:cry: :roll:
Guys,
Start a Tire and Truck thread and quit Hijacking this one!
Fred


Author: Marshall

Date: 12 Dec 2005 6:52 am

Bob, I thought all 1 ton 3500's were DRW on those models, I didn't know you could get them in SRW?


Author: ramit

Date: 12 Dec 2005 8:14 am

The 2500 is well underbadged. Marketing, had to give a guys a reason to buy the dually.


With the sales of the srw soo strong, last year they started labeling the srw oil burning 2500 a 3500 srw.


I have a modified d70 in the rear and the same d60 up front as the 3500.

I have a the 1 ton transfer case and the same auto you find in the 3500, and same engine and same rear leafs.
Same front and rear brakes (minus the offsets on the hubs for the dually wheels, the srw are a bit stronger up front since the wheel hub is more centered and not run out as on the front of the dually to adapt for the drw wheels). Same frame.


Only thing missing on the drw and the badge!


On the other hand the gas powered 2500 (depending on the year had all of most of these differences), had the smaller auto, d60 rear, same front, thinner frame, smaller capacity rear brakes, smaller rear leafs, lighter frot coils. around ~1klbs less on the gvw, smaller transfer case.


Author: Marshall

Date: 12 Dec 2005 11:00 am

I see, that makes sense to me now. Nice truck!


Author: jubol

Date: 12 Dec 2005 4:17 pm

:shock: :shock:
If I can steal the Thread back.
When I checked my new Husky blower tire pressure, they were at 26 PSI.
Lowered them to 15.5 PSI. Halfway between Max and Min!!
Fred


Author: dave___in___ct

Date: 12 Dec 2005 7:11 pm

OK...

Back to snowblower tire pressure...

Depends on whether it has snow tires... or summer street tires... ...or racing slicks ! :P


Dave...


Author: robmints

Date: 12 Dec 2005 7:26 pm

dave___in___ct wrote:
OK...

Back to snowblower tire pressure...

Depends on whether it has snow tires... or summer street tires... ...or racing slicks ! :P


Dave...


Tracks here.

One thing real quick please Fred.

Ramit,
I'll get you my neighbors number so you can take her for a ride when you are in town.